Calendar, Spring 2004



Spring 2004


Week 1 - January 19 - 23

Monday, January 19

First day of classes for Spring Semester.

Friday, January 23, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. (Not the usual location, but close!) Bring your lunch tray to Lower Dempsey to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, January 23, 3:10PM - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Professor Chris Hammel, Ohio Eminent Scholar in Experimental
Physics, The Ohio State University. " Force-Detected Scanned Probe Magnetic Resonance Microscopy" Abstract:  Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) is a novel scanned probe technique that combines the three-dimensional imaging capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the high sensitivity and resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This emerging technology holds clear potential single electron spin sensitivity. When fully realized, MRFM will provide a unique method for non-destructive, chemically specific, subsurface imaging---with applicability to a wide variety of materials. I will outline the MRFM technique and review results to date spanning applications of MRFM to nuclear spin, electron spin, and ferromagnetic resonance. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 2 - January 26 - 30

Friday, January 30, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, January 30, 3:10PM - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Professor Emeritus Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr., Kenyon College. "The First Fifty Years of Photography" Abstract: The first fifty years of photography, starting with the announcements of the Daguerreotype and Calotype processes in 1839, saw an outpouring of inventive genius comparable to the introduction of digital photography in the nineteen nineties. This talk will start with the Daguerreotype, move on to the early positive/negative processes and then address the tintype, a form of photography invented by Prof. Hamilton Smith of Kenyon College in 1854. It will conclude with stereoscopic imagery, first proposed by Charles Wheatstone in 1837 and practiced today by the speaker. Examples of Daguerreotypes, tintypes and
stereoscopic views will be on display, and the talk will be illustrated with lantern slides. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 3 - February 2 - 6

Friday, February 6, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, February 6, 3:10PM - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Professor Emeritus Franklin Miller, Jr. Kenyon College. "Two kinds of electrons??" Abstract: In the late 1920s physicists faced the possibility that two kinds of electrons, nearly identical, exist in nature. The ratio of charge to mass (e/m) measured spectroscopically by the Zeeman effect was significantly larger than the value measured by the classical magnetic deflection method for free electrons. Likewise the magnitude of the charge (e) measured by diffraction of x-rays by a crystal was significantly larger than the value for free electrons measured by the Millikan oil-drop method. We will consider these experiments in detail and tell how the discrepancies were resolved. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 4 - February 9 - 13

Friday, February 13, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Upper Dempsey (not the usual location, but close!) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Week 5 - February 16 - 20

Monday, February 16, 4:10PM - 5:00PM

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Research Presentation (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Sandra Doty, Ohio State Unversity, "What is an ERG and why should you care?" Abstract: Almost everyone is familiar with an EKG (now known as an ECG) and has some idea of its use. In contrast few have even heard of, much less know anything about the eye's equivalent to an ECG – the ERG. So, what is an ERG? How is it obtained? How is it used? More importantly, why should you – or anyone – care? In this talk I will provide a short introduction to the flash electroretinogram (ERG) and its use in vision research. I will specifically address how basic signal analysis of the ERG was used to aid in elucidating the role of aspartate aminotransferase in the metabolic function of the rat retina and the role a physicist can play in a biomedical lab. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Tuesday, February 17, 11:10AM - 12:00N

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Mock Class (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Sandra Doty, Ohio State Unversity "Angular Momentum"
 

Thursday, February 19, 4:10PM - 5:00PM

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Mock Class (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Christopher LaSota, Muskingum College "Angular Momentum"
 

Friday, February 20, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, February 20, 3:10PM - 4:00PM

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Research Presentation (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Christopher LaSota, Muskingum College, "A Novel Method for Modeling Biological Development Using Discrete-State Automata Networks"Abstract: Early attempts by Turing, von Neumann and others to model biological development were based on cellular automata systems.  Although such models have had limited success in reproducing pigmentation patterns seen in living organisms, they have not been able to mimic the growth of a single eukaryote cell into a multi-cellular and differentiated adult form.  A view gaining support in developmental biology is that much of the self-organized complexity seen in living organisms is a natural consequence of the dynamic structure of genetic regulatory networks.  This talk will present a method for incorporating models of these gene networks into cellar automata systems and will introduce an alternative approach for analyzing cellular automata activity that focuses on dynamic pathways rather than on the individual states of each cell in the model. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.


Week 6 - February 23 - 27

Monday, February 23, 4:10PM - 5:00PM

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Research Presentation (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Christopher Martin, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics,  “Radio Milky Way:  Broadcasting 24 Hours a Day to a Receiver Near You” Abstract: When you think about what you can see in the night sky, you normally think first about what you can see with just your eyes.  But beyond optical light, there is a wide range of other frequencies that give us additional information about the universe around us.  I'll show you how radio frequency light can be detected and used as a probe for determining the temperature, density, and chemical composition of clouds of dust and gas in deep space.  Then I'll explain how this same information can be used to answer questions about the way our galaxy rotates and how new stars are formed.  Finally, I'll tell you why I travel to the coldest, driest, and most remote regions of Antarctica to install and use the instruments that make this science possible. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Tuesday, February 24, 11:10AM - 12:00N

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Mock Class (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Christopher Martin, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics "Angular Momentum"

Thursday, February 26, 4:10PM - 5:00PM

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Mock Class (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Sharmila Kamat, Case Western Reserve University"Angular Momentum"

Friday, February 27, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, February 27, 3:10PM - 4:00PM

Visiting Assistant Professor Candidate Research Presentation (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) Dr. Sharmila Kamat, Case Western Reserve Unviersity, “Hunting for WIMPs with Ultra-Cold Detectors”Abstract:  Recent astronomical evidence indicates that only 5% of the cosmos is known to us, 95% remains stubbornly hidden from view. Of this, 22% constitutes the missing mass of the Universe, the so-called dark matter. Theoretical predictions suggest that this unknown mass could be made of a generic class of particles called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), relics of the Big Bang that still exist today because of their weak interactions with ordinary matter.  The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search looks for WIMPs using position sensitive Germanium and Silicon detectors which simultaneously measure ionization and phonon energies deposited by particle interactions.  The detectors are operated at milli-Kelvin temperatures in a shielded environment 2300 feet below ground in a former iron mine in Northern Minnesota.  Past experimental runs at a shallower site confirmed the excellent background rejection capability of the detectors and set new limits on the detection of WIMPs.  The shift to a deeper site is expected to increase our sensitivity to WIMP detection by a factor of 100. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 7 - March 1 - 5

Friday, March 5, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department in celebrating the beginning of Spring Break!

Spring Break! March 8 - 19


Week 8 - March 22 - 26

Friday, March 26, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation. We will regale each other with Spring Break adventure stories.


Week 9 - March 29 - April 2

Friday, April 2, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, April 2, 3:10PM - 4PM

Senior Exercise Talks (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) (Note special start time!)
3:00 - 3:30  PM Doug Leong "The Physics of Karate"
3:35 - 4:05 PM Stillian Ghaidarov "The Thermodynamics of Computation"

Week 10 - April 5 - 9

Tuesday, April 6, 3:10PM - 4PM

Senior Exercise Talks :(Samuel Mather Hall 201) (Note special place as well as time!)
11:00 - 11:30 PM Topher White "Perpetual Motion Machines"
11:35 - 12:05 PM Sarah Taylor 
"The Computer as a Musical Instrument"

Friday, April 9, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, April 9, 3:10PM - 4PM

Senior Exercise Talks (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109) (Note special start time!)
3:00 - 3:30 PM Merida Batiste "The Origin of the Universe"
3:35 - 4:05 PM Andy Heroy "The Physics of Golf Balls"

Week 11 - April 12 - 16

Tuesday, April 13th, 11:10AM - 11:45AM

Senior Exercise Talk (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, Hayes 109). Robert Fairbairn, "Concert Hall Acoustics"

Thursday, April 15

Honor's Day!

Friday, April 16, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, April 16, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Dr. Jerry Meyer, Naval Research Laboratory "The Type-II “W” Quantum Well Laser for the Midwave Infrared" Abstract:  In recent years, the type-II “W” laser has become the leading interband semiconductor emitter for the midwave infrared spectral region between 3 and 5 mm. Its name is taken from the conduction-band profile of its InAs/GaSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells. “Wavefunction engineering” of this structure enables it to combine: (1) High barriers that keep the carriers from wandering off; (2) Strong overlap of the electron and hole wavefunctions despite the type-II band alignment that centers them in different layers; (3) A 2-dimensional (rather than 3-dimensional) density of states to sharpen the onset of gain; and (4) Suppression of the 3-carrier Auger process which generates heat without producing any light. These advantages led to the first continuous-wave operation of any mid-IR semiconductor laser at room temperature. Currently, at least 10 different American and European research groups are developing various types of W lasers.
The seminar will review applications for mid-IR lasers, families of semiconductor materials, the physics behind how a semiconductor laser works, and why lasing in the mid-IR is such a difficult problem, before describing the W laser’s recent progress using a variety of novel configurations. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 12 - April 19 - 23

Friday, April 23, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, April 23, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Eaton Lattman, Chair, Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, "Proteins For Physicists" Abstract: For biologists protein molecules are the objects that carry out most of the important functions in living organisms.  For example, they catalyze chemical reactions (enzymes), they ferry other molecules around (cholesterol is carried by low density lipoprotein), they help control the environment inside the cell (ion channels, pumps). But protein molecules are also fascinating objects from the point of view of physics.  They are linear polymers that display behavior wildly different from the simpler polymers (e.g., polyethylene) studied by the statistical methods originating with Flory. There are twenty different possible monomers (amino acids) that are strung together to make a protein, while convention polymers have only one or two.  This allows for very complex behavior.  In addition, all protein molecules of a given type are IDENTICAL in the number of amino acids, in the sequence of amino acids.  The conformational behavior of the protein polymer chain is also exceptional.  When a protein is synthesized in the cell, the chain is in a poorly organized state reminiscent of the random coil in simple polymer theory.  However, the molecule rapidly undergoes a collapse to a unique three-dimensional structure that represents the active, native form of the molecule.  This process is called protein folding, and resembles a microscopic, first-order phase transition.  In the native, folded state all molecules of a given type have identical structures (ignoring dynamical fluctuations).  They can form well-ordered three-dimensional crystals:  presumably the wave function is coherent over an entire molecule. The talk will first provide a physically oriented introduction to protein molecules, and will then discuss methods to analyze and understand interesting aspects of protein behavior, such as folding.  The last few minutes will be devoted to the speaker’s work on the electrostatic behavior of proteins.
Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 13 - April 26 - 30

Friday, April 30, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, April 30, 3:10-4:00PM

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (RBH 109)Professor Gregory Snider,  Department of Electrical Engineering, Notre Dame University "Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata" Abstract: Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) is a promising architecture using quantum dots for digital computation. It is a revolutionary approach that addresses the issues of device scalability and power dissipation. It represents a concrete device design, scalable down to atomic dimensions, with possible implementations in metals, semiconductors, and molecules. A basic QCA cell consists of four quantum dots located at the corners
of a square, coupled capacitively and by tunnel barriers. Two excess electrons within the four dots are forced to opposite "corners" of the four-dot system by Coulomb repulsion. These two possible polarization states of the cell will represent logic "0" and "1". Properly arranged, arrays of these basic cells can implement the
Boolean logic functions, and memory, needed for general-purpose computation. An introduction to the QCA architecture will be presented, along experimental results from a functional QCA cell built of nanoscale metal dots defined by tunnel barriers. The experiments to be presented show a controlled polarization switch
of a QCA cell. This and additional results confirm the control of the switching of a single electron by a single electron, and demonstrates a non-linear, bistable response in the QCA cell. There is excellent agreement between the experimental results and theory. A QCA majority gate (a basic logic gate) will be presented, along with a demonstration of power gain. A short introduction will be given to molecular QCA implementations, and initial experimental results will be presented.
Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 14 - May 3 - 7

Friday, May 7

Last day of classes for Spring Semester!

Friday, May 7, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, May 7, 3:10-4:00PM

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (RBH 109). Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr., Kenyon College "The Art of Physics Demonstrations III." Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.


   Contact:  Connie Miller, Dept. of Physics.   

Created by Bethany Anderson, Kenyon College 2005
 October 25, 2003
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