Physics at Kenyon: Spring, '02 Weekly Events Calendar


Spring 2002


Week 1 - January 14 - 18

Monday, January 14

First day of classes for Spring Semester.

Friday, January 18, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. (Not the usual location, but close!) Bring your lunch tray to Lower Dempsey to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 2 - January 21 - 25

Friday, January 25, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, January 25, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109). Benjamin Schumacher, Kenyon College. "Quantum information and quantum computing". Quantum physics has been around since the 1920's; computers and information theory, since the 1940's. But it is only in the last decade that we have begun to understand what information and computing must mean in the quantum world. The agenda includes: two slogans for the revolution; a new word in the dictionary; how to keep secrets; teleportation; a computer that doesn't know what it's doing; how to penetrate secrets; a cruel dilemma; Babbage's wheels; and a serious wager. Reception to follow in Schreiner Lounge (MAP 108).

Friday, January 25, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 3 - January 28 - February 1

Friday, February 1, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, February 1, 3:10 - 4:00PM (Tentative)

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109). Beau Bierhaus, '95, University of Colorado, Department of Aerospace Engineering and the Southwest Research Institute. "Secondary Craters: A Discovery Using Galileo Image Data, or, On the Use of a Liberal Arts Degree." Mr. Bierhaus will provide an overview of his current research, which focuses on secondary craters (small craters formed by the material ejected from a primary impact).  In addition to studying the roduction and distribution of secondaries, his work includes developing a means to automatically distinguish secondary craters from primary craters using machine vision techniques.  In between the various plots, images, and equations, Mr. Bierhaus's talk will be interspersed with anecdotes regarding the usefulness of his Kenyon degree. Reception to follow in Schreiner Lounge (MAP 108).


Week 4 - February 4 - 8

Friday, February 8, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, February 8, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109) Elias Greenbaum, Corporate Fellow and Research Group Leader, Nanoscale Science, Biophysical Chemistry, and Molecular Electronics, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, "Nanoscale Photosynthesis, the Photophysics of Neural Cells, and Artificial Sight." Reception to follow in the Schreiner Lounge (MAP 108).

Abstract: This presentation provides an overview of recent progress in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/University of Tennessee research program in molecular electronics and green plant photosynthesis.  We have demonstrated that the isolated Photosystem I (PSI) reaction center is a nanoscale molecular diode and photovoltaic device.  One goal of our research is construction of molecular electronic devices from these nanoscale structures.  Progress has been demonstrated by direct electrical contact of emergent electrons from the PSI reaction center by nanoparticle platinum precipitation.  The stable diode properties of isolated reaction centers combined with the ability to orient PSI by self-assembly on a planar surface makes this structure a potential building block for 2-D and possibly 3-D devices.

A second goal of our research is restoration of photoreceptor activity to people who are blind from retinal degenerations such as age-related macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa.  We extracted and purified integral membrane PSI reaction centers from spinach leaves and measured their open and closed circuit photovoltages (1,2).  The open circuit value is at least 1 V whereas the closed circuit value is at least 0.6 V.  A quantitative analysis of the known physical properties of PSI reaction centers and voltage-gated ion channels indicates that PSI may be able to trigger opening of the channels.  The cell membrane can be depolarized or hyperpolarized depending on the orientation of the PSI reaction center in the membrane.  PSI-proteoliposomes will be used as the delivery vehicle.  We have successfully inserted PSI reaction centers into liposome membranes and, using P700 absorption spectroscopy, demonstrated that the reaction centers retain their functional activity in the liposomes.  We have also obtained microscopic evidence that the liposomes are capable of fusing with the membranes of retinoblastoma cells.  The lecture will be self-contained; no prior knowledge of photosynthesis or visual physiology will be assumed.
 


Week 5 - February 11 - 15

Friday, February 15, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, February 15, 3:10-4:00PM

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109) David Pengra, Ohio Wesleyan UniversityHost : Ben Schumacher. "What Famous Physicists Have to Say about Squeezing Money out of Rocks." Abstract: Some very important economic activity involves moving fluid through porous rock: oil and gas production, water extraction, and control of underground contaminants are a few examples. How easily one does these jobs depends on the properties of the relevant rock formation. The underlying physics--flow in porous media--is intimately related to the processes at the interface between the fluid and solid inside the rock pores. Because of technological advances in instrumentation the physics dreamed up by the likes of Onsager, Debye, Helmholtz, Smoluchowski and others, some of which has been known for a century, can be used to understand experiments performed on fluid-filled porous rock. I will describe how sensitive measurements of electrokinetics--the coupling of electric and fluid currents--are performed with a low-frequency AC technique, and how the results can be used to determine rock permeability and study brine-rock surface chemistry. Reception to follow in the MAP Lobby


Week 6 - February 18 - 22

Thursday, February 21, 11:10AM - 12N

Mock Class (Visiting Search Presentation) RBH 213. Bogomil Gerganov. "Angular Momentum"

Friday, February 22, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, February 22, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

Physics Colloquium (Visiting Search Research Presentation) Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (RBH 109). Bogomil Gerganov,  Cornell University. "Integrability in Two-Dimensional Physics and Its Applications" Abstract: This talk introduces the concept of integrability in classical and quantum physics, from the historical discovery of the soliton to present-day developments. It discusses the great significance of symmetries and conservation laws in the context of integrability. The powerful investigative techniques arising from exact-solvability are illustrated by a recently obtained $\beta$-function for a model with possible applications to disorder. Reception to follow in RBH 108.

Friday, February 22, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 7 - February 25 - March 1

Monday, February 25, 11:10AM-12N

Physics Colloquium (Visiting Search Research Presentation) Tomsich 103. Anne Caraley, Indiana University. "What's New in Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics? The High Resolution Array (HiRA) and The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA)'' Abstract: Presently, the focus of heavy-ion nuclear physics is shifting from "conventional'' experiments, as performed at many university-based laboratories, to those performed at facilities using radioactive-ion beams. Planning for a new Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is underway. The "exotic'' beams made available at RIA will allow nuclear physicists to explore topics ranging from the structure of nuclei to aspects of nucleosynthesis. All of these investigations will require superb instrumentation. To address that need, the Nuclear Dynamics Group of Indiana University (in collaboration with Michigan State University and Washington University) are developing a new high-resolution detector array (HiRA). HiRA will provide the excellent angular and energy resolution needed by many of the future experiments.

Tuesday, February 26, 11:10AM - 12N

Mock Class (Visiting Search Presentation) Franklin Miller Lecture Hall (RBH 109). Anne Caraley.  "Angular Momentum"

Thursday, February 28, 11:10AM - 12N

Mock Class (Visiting Search Presentation) Franklin Miller Lecture Hall (RBH 109). Keith Rielage. "Angular Momentum"

Friday, March 1, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department in celebrating the beginning of Spring Break!
 

Friday, March 1, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Visiting Search Research Presentation) Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (RBH 109). Keith Rielage, Washington University. "Scintillating fibers and their use in high-energy astrophysics." Abstract: The basic properties of scintillating optical fibers will be presented. Scintillating fibers provide a simple method of detecting the passage of charged particles and can be used in a number of applications. Among these applications are cosmic-ray calorimeters and gamma-ray trackers. Such detectors could provide new information that might answer the century-old question of how cosmic rays are accelerated to high energies. We will explore this question and examine several prototype scintillating fiber instruments. Reception to follow in the Schreiner Lounge (RBH 108).


Spring Break!

March 4 - 15


Week 8 - March 18 - 22

Friday, March 22, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation. We will regale each other with Spring Break adventure stories.
 

Friday, March 22, 3:10 - 3:40PM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): James Monsees, '02 "The Discovery of Superfluidity"

Friday, March 22, 3:40 - 4:10PM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): Neil Hall, '02 "The History of Flight" Reception to follow in the MAP Lobby.


Week 9 - March 25 - 29

Friday, March 29, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, March 29, 3:10 - 3:40PM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): Alexander York, '02 "Image Transformation by Electrons" Reception to follow MAP Lobby.

Friday, March 29, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 10 - April 1 - 5

Friday, April 5, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, April 5, 3:10 - 3:40PM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): Lauren Coil, '02, "The Acoustics of Violin Plates"

Friday, April 5, 3:40 - 4:10PM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): Ericka Hively, '02 "Gothic Structural Experimentation" Reception to follow in the MAP Lobby.


Week 11 - April 8 - 12

Friday, April 12, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, April 12, 3:10 - 3:40PM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): Bridget Seall, '02, "The Origin of the Universe"

Friday, April 12, 3:40 - 4:10PM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): Dave Wiant, '02, "Precise Measurement of Time" Reception to follow in the MAP Lobby.


Week 12 - April 15 - 19

Tuesday, April 16, 11:10-11:50AM

Senior Exercise Presentation, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109): Emily Berkeley, '03, "A Reporter at Large : Nuclear Waste"

Thursday, April 18

Honors Day!

Friday, April 19, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, April 19, 1:10 - 2:00PM

Special Presentation, Physics Lounge (RBH 216). John Woollam, '61 , will meet with students and faculty to discuss opportunities for physicists in industry and on starting a growing a high tech company.

Friday, April 19, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109) . John Woollam, '61, Departments of Electrical Engineering and Physics, University of Nebraska, Lincoln and President, J.A.Woollam Co., Inc. Waves in Water and Space, for Fun and Profit Abstract: When boating, waves can be fun, scary, fascinating, or annoying. Likewise, waves are an essential aspect of much physics, including sound, heat, light, the quantum description of matter, and even analyses of complex mathematical problems.  A wonderful aspect of boating is that one can visualize wave-physics and wave interactions with matter, in ways not possible with light waves. This author uses any excuse he can get to go boating, including the chance to study wave physics. In the laboratory he uses light waves from the vacuum ultraviolet to the far-infrared to solve problems in basic physics, biology, engineering, and the harsh environment of space exploration. He also has a company to manufacture state-of-the-art optical instruments for the world s researchers.  This talk surveys the nature of waves, polarized light, spectroscopic ellipsometers, and their applications in fundamental science and industry. Reception to follow in the RBH Lobby


Week 13 - April 22 - 26

Thursday - Saturday, April 25-26

Celebration of Science. Symposium, tours, poster session, and dedication of new and renovated science buildings at Kenyon.

Friday, April 26, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, April 26, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 14 - April 29 - May 3

Friday, May 3

Last day of classes for Spring Semester!

Friday, May 3, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, May 3, 3:10-4:00PM

Physics Colloquium, Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall (MAP 109). Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr., Kenyon College "The Art of Physics Demonstrations" Reception to follow in the MAP Lobby.



 
 


Contact: Jennifer Hedden , Dept. of Physics. Updated 30-April-2002 (TSS) K-vector Kenyon shield