Calendar, Fall 2005                        

Fall 2005


Week 1 - August 29 - September 2

Monday, August 29

First day of classes for Fall Semester.

Friday, September 2, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch.  Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Hall to join the department for stimulating conversation.  We'll have a table reserved for Physics.


Week 2 - September 5-9

Friday, September 9, 12PM - 1PM Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation with our distinguished visitor.

Thursday, September 8, 7:30 p.m.

The 2rd Annual Donald M. Hamister Distinguished Lecture in Physics (Brandi Recital Hall) Dr. Chris Quigg,  Theoretical Physics Department Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory  Title: "The Coming Revolutions in Particle Physics" Abstract :  Wonderful opportunities await particle physicists over the next decade, with new instruments and experiments poised to explore the frontiers of high energy, infinitesimal distances, and exquisite rarity. We expect a new era of discovery that brings answers to questions that speak to our understanding of the everyday world: why are there atoms? Why chemistry? Why stable structures? And even what makes life possible? We are probing profound mysteries surrounding elemental bits of matter: what makes an electron an electron and a top quark a top quark? Important clues, including the remarkable neutrality of atoms, lead us to investigate the unity of the two main classes of matter, the quarks and leptons. Gravity and particle physics, long separate disciplines, are enjoying a stimulating reunion, and we are learning how to investigate -- with experiments -- new conceptions of spacetime.

 
For more information about Dr. Quigg, please visit:   http://lutece.fnal.gov/

Reception to follow Storer Hall Lobby.

Friday, September 9, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Chris Quigg,  Theoretical Physics Department Fermi National

Accelerator Laboratory.  Title:  “The Double Simplex:  Envisioning Particles and Interactions”   Abstract:   Dr. Quigg will present a new way to envision the particles and interactions. Any chart or mnemonic device should be an invitation to narrative and a spur to curiosity, and that is what I intend for the double simplex. His goal will be to represent what we know is true, what we hope might be true, and what we don’t know--in other terms, to show the connections that are firmly established, those we believe must be there, and the open issues.  He will also express the spirit of play, of successive approximations, that animates the way scientists work.  Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.


Week 3 - September 12 - 16

Friday, September 16, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 4 - September 19-23

Friday, September 22, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 5 - September 26 - 30

Friday, September 30, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.  

Friday, September 30, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Casey Watson, The Ohio State University, Title:  “X-raying the Universe:  The Star Formation and Supermassive Black Hole Accretion Histories of “Normal” Galaxies”  Abstract:  Thanks to the Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton and their predecessors, we have made great strides in understanding the accretion history of the Universe.  The X-ray properties of galaxies with quiescent nuclei, i.e., "normal" galaxies, remain poorly understood, however.  One reason for this is that probing a sizeable (representative) sample of this X-ray faint population between redshifts z = 0.1 and z = 1 would require simultaneously deep and wide-area observations, and such a campaign would place unreasonable demands on astronomical resources.  As a result, most of our knowledge to date about these systems comes from either large-area, local surveys or high-redshift, small-volume deep fields.  To bridge this gap, we combine optical data from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field and AGES Surveys with Chandra X-ray coverage of galaxies in a 9.3 square degree field. By using the multiwavelength constraints from these three surveys, we are able to measure and interpret the X-ray evolution of thousands of "normal" galaxies over the largely unexplored redshift range 0.1 < z < 1. After describing the possible sources of the signal we detect, i.e., stellar (X-ray Binaries) vs. nuclear (accreting supermassive black holes), I will discuss our classifications for the galaxies and which source dominates the emission from each galaxy type.  Interestingly, the evolutionary trends we find for the star formation and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion rate densities of these normal galaxies are in good agreement with those found in previous studies of much brighter sources. Our work shows that there is a continuum rather than a sudden break in the accretion histories of galaxies from the powerful starbursts and Active Galactic Nuclei of the past to the fainter, optically-normal galaxies that are more prevalent today.  Reception to follow in Hayes Hall lobby.


Week 6 - October 3 - 7

Friday, October 7, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Private Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 7 - October 10 - 14

Monday, October 10 and Tuesday, October 11

October Reading Days! 

Friday, October 14, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 8 - October 17 - 21

Friday, October 21, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.  


Week 9 - October 24 - 28

Friday, October 27, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 10 - October 31 - November 4

Friday, November 4, 12PM - 1PM 

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 4, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  David Slochower, 07,  Title:  "The Molecular Dynamics of Water Surrounding Hen

Lysozyme Protein: A Comparison of Two Models"  Abstract:  The first significant application of computational physics to biology was in 1983 when Bernard Brooks and his colleagues at Harvard synthesized a program (CHARMM) to model macromolecular systems using empirical energy functions.  Currently, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used throughout biochemistry and molecular biology to model systems and understand concepts that are unavailable or difficult to gain insight into through traditional experimentation. Through MD simulations, water has been distinguished as a crucial molecule in the dynamics and functionality of globular proteins (Bizzarri and Cannistraro, 2002).  In the past, typical simulations have been run with a single protein with a diameter of 25 Angstroms in a box with sides of 64 Angstroms saturated by as many as 6300 water molecules, while the study concluded that as few as 350 molecules were necessary for full hydration of the protein (Steinbach and Brooks, 1993).  This means that up to 80% of the computation effort is spent on water molecules. Through simulations, I intended the minimization of water to be not only a computational tool but also to more accurately model physiological conditions.  Reception to follow.

 


Week 11 - November 7 - 11

Friday, November 11, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

   


Week 12 - November 14 - 18

Friday, November 18, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 18, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)
  John deBruyn, The Western Ontario University, Department of Physics and Astronomy,  Title:  Morphology and Scaling of Impact Craters in Granular Media   Abstract:  We study the size and morphology of impact craters formed when a steel ball is dropped into a container of small glass beads. We find that both the depth (measured from the original surface) and diameter of the crater are proportional to the 1/4 power of energy. This is as expected if the energy of impact goes into excavating the crater and material strength is unimportant. We observe a variety of crater morphologies as a function of impact energy and grain size: simple craters, craters with a central peak, craters with slump terraces around the perimeter, and multi-ringed craters. The progression of these changes in morphology is similar to that observed in lunar craters. Dr. de Bruyn will discuss this behavior in terms of the properties of the granular medium and speculate on the relevance of our results in the context of planetary craters.  Reception to follow.

 


Thanksgiving Break Week - November 21 - 25


Week 13 - November 28 - December 2

Friday, December 2, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 14 - December 5 - 9

Friday, December 9, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, December 9, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Glen Gillen, Air Force Research Labs   Title:  “Experimental And Theoretical Work In Linear Beam Propagation Through Materials And Structures, And Other Cool Stuff…”    Abstract:    The propagation of light through materials and structures is a fundamental phenomenon that occurs all around us.  Although the propagation of light through linear optical media is a seemingly simple process, measuring, calculating and predicting the behavior of light within optical structures can become theoretically and experimentally challenging if a high degree of precision is desired.  Accurate knowledge of the linear optical properties of exotic materials and the behavior of light propagation within those materials is essential for modeling and predicting the nonlinear behavior of light at higher intensities.  The first half of the presentation will describe some of the experimental research conducted with infrared laser light propagating through semiconductor materials with the goal of measuring the materials linear refractive index and its temperature dependence.  The latter half of the presentation will describe some theoretical work in modeling and predicting light distributions within a focusing medium.  Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.  


Week 15 - December 12 - 16

Tuesday, December 13

Last day of classes for Fall Semester!

Friday, December 16, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Gund Dining Room to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Have a safe and happy break.  See you next year!


 

 Contact:  Connie Miller, Dept. of Physics. 

 
Created by Bethany Anderson,

Kenyon College 2005

October 25, 2003

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