Calendar, Fall 2003



Fall 2003


Week 1 - August 25 - 29

Thursday, August 28

First day of classes for Fall Semester.

Thursday, August 28, 11:10AM - 12:00N

Meeting of Physics Department students and faculty on Thursday, August 28th at 11:10 AM (Common Hour) in MAP 213. On the agenda will be the senior exercise and honors, student jobs in physics, news and announcements, and some career advice.

Friday, August 29, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch.  Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Week 2 - September 1 - 5

Friday, September 5, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 5, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Greg Davis, '97, Fermi National Accelerator Lab "DZero and the Energy Frontier in 2003 AD" Abstract:  In 1909, by pounding an atom as hard as possible, Ernest Rutherford, with the help of his students Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden, discovered that the atom contained a massive nucleus. The notion of "as hard as possible" placed their experiment on the "energy frontier". Today, the energy frontier is at the Fermilab Tevatron, where the energy is a million times higher.  In the collqouium, I will discuss my work at the Tevatron's DZero experiment studying physics at the current energy frontier.Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 3 - September 8 - 12

Friday, September 12, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 12, 4PM - Sunday, September 14, 2PM

Road Trip to FermiLab! Join Professors Sullivan, Schumacher, and Turner in a trip to visit the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and other sites in Chicago.

Week 4 - September 15 - 19

Friday, September 19, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 19, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Robert Arns, University of Vermont "Early History of X-Ray Tubes" Abstract:
X-rays were discovered in 1895 as byproducts of an electrical discharge in an ionized gas and for many years the gas tube was the standard means of x-ray production. These early x-ray tubes, being dependent on maintaining a narrow range of gas pressure, were capricious and unstable in operation. A 1912 paper by the Leipzig physicist Julius Edgar Lilienfeld described an x-ray tube that avoided these difficulties. It operated at a much higher vacuum and the electrons that produced the X-rays resulted from thermionic emission from a heated cathode. Lilienfeld applied for German and U.S. patents on his x-ray tube in October 1911 and in 1912. An entry in his laboratory notebook shows that William David Coolidge of General Electric Company began thinking about a high-vacuum x-ray tube with a thermionic cathode in December 1912; he applied for a patent in May 1913. The transition taking place at this time between the description of physical phenomena in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., voltage, current, "rays," gas pressure) and the description in terms of submicroscopic events (e.g., involving atoms, ions, electrons) is vividly illustrated by the ways in which these two physicists thought about and described their x-ray tubes. This report will discuss the physics of these early x-ray tubes and the various other factors that led to Coolidge being widely acclaimed as the inventor of the "modern" x-ray tube. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 5 - September 22 - 26

Friday, September 26, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, September 26, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Ben Schumacher,  Kenyon College "The Physics of Impossible Things" Abstract: Some things can happen in our Universe, and others cannot.  The laws of physics, in part, help us map out the line between possibility and  impossibility.  Physicists naturally spend most of their time thinking about the possible.  In this talk, however, we will make a brief reconnaissance across the frontier to study impossible things and the surprising connections between them.  We will encounter time machines, faster-than-light travel and perpetual motion engines -- as well as other, less-familiar prodigies like quantum cloners and bounded electromagnetic miracles.  (A safe return to the real world is unconditionally guaranteed!) Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 6 - September 29 - October 3

Friday, October 3, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, October 3, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Alexander (AJ) Franz, '04,  Kenyon College "Determination of the dielectric functions of MBE-grown Zn1-xMgxTe II-VI semiconductor alloys" Abstract: We have explored the dielectric functions of ternary Zn1-xMgxTe thin films using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer in the energy range between 0.7 and 6.5 eV. Initially, the alloy concentrations were determined using x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence for samples between  x = 0 and x = 0.52. We obtained values for the complex dielectric function for Zn1-xMgxTe in both the transparent and absorption regions by incorporating a three-layer model to simulate the experimental data. To this end, we also used  previously published relations of the  dispersion of the indices of refraction (in the transparent region) of Zn1-xMgxTe measured using a combination of prism coupler and reflectivity. We have fit the second derivatives of both the real and the imaginary parts of the dielectric constants to obtain the critical point parameters corresponding to the higher order electronic transitions in the lattice. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 7 - October 6 - 10

Thursday, October 9 and Friday, October 10

October Reading Days! No Physics Colloquium

Friday, October 10, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Week 8 - October 13 - 17

Friday, October 17, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, October 17, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Keith Walker, Department of Physics, Point Loma Nazarene University and Affiliated Scholar, Kenyon College "Mobile Robots and Chaos Theory" Abstract: A brief overview of mobile autonomous robotics will be presented with some accompanying areas of present day research. Unfortunately, mobile robotics research is still largely reliant on trial-and-error procedures since there are no theories to describe robot-environment interaction in a formal manner. We will describe our research which is a 'first step' attempt to establish a theoretical foundation for robotic behaviour using time series analysis and deterministic chaos theory. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 9 - October 20 - 24

Friday, October 24

Inauguration Weekend!

Friday, October 24, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. (Not the usual location, but close!) Bring your lunch tray to Lower Dempsey to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Week 10 - October 27 - 31

Thursday, October 30

Founder's Day!

Friday, October 31, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Upper Dempsey (not the usual location!) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, October 31, 3:10PM - 1PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Jeffrey Dyck, Department of Physics, John Carroll University "Diluted magnetic semiconductors based the layered A2VB3VI compounds" Abstract: Currently, there is a great deal research activity on the incorporation of magnetic ions into semiconductors to produce ferromagnetism. These diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) are of interest both to theorists, because of their unusual mechanisms of magnetic behavior, and to experimentalists, because the manipulation of spin in addition to charge promises devices based on spin polarized transport. The most extensively studied DMS systems to date are based on II-VI and III-V semiconductors doped with manganese. Recently, we discovered a new class of diluted magnetic semiconductors that differ from the traditional compounds a number of intriguing ways. The narrow band gap tetradymite-type semiconductors with the form A2VB3VI  (A = Sb, Bi and B = Se, Te) are normally associated with thermoelectric cooling devices. However, both Sb2-xVxTe3 and Bi2-xFexTe3 display ferromagnetic semiconductor behavior. In this talk, I will discuss the interesting properties of these compounds. Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 11 - November 3 - 7

Friday, November 7, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, November 7, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Craig Siders ('88) and Jennifer Walker Siders ('91), School of Optics and the Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers, University of Central Florida "A Tale of Two Kenyon Physics Majors" Abstract: Dr. Craig Siders ('88) and Dr. Jennifer Walker Siders ('91) will speak about their life after Kenyon -- Grad School, Post Docs, Faculty positions, research & teaching, the two body problem and illustrate some of the pros and cons a liberal arts education provides in contemporary physics and engineering.Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 12 - November 10 - 14

Friday, November 14, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 14, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Victoria Soghomonian, Department of Physics, Ohio University "Experimental studies of charge transport through DNA molecules" Abstract:  The elucidation of the double helical structure of DNA fifty years ago initiated extensive research on both the self-recognition capabilities and  electronic properties of this biomolecule. Motivated by the prospect of utilizing DNA in nanoelectronic applications, the past several years have sustained a resurgence of both experimental and theoretical reports  regarding the electronic properties of DNA. So far, literature reports  vary widely in their choice of experimental parameters and transport mechanisms, and reach a broad range of conclusions, portraying DNA molecules as insulating, semiconducting, or even proximity-induced superconducting. In this talk, I will address experimental conditions under which we have measured charge transport in long lambda-DNA molecules with reasonable reproducibility. Chemical modification to lambda-DNA leading to interesting current-voltage characteristics will be
discussed. Lastly, experimental results that highlight the importance of the double helical structure to charge transport through DNA molecules, will be presented.
Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.

Week 13 - November 17 - 21

Friday, November 21, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Thanksgiving Break Week - November 24-28


Week 14 - December 1 - 5

Friday, December 5, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, December 5, 3:10PM - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109)  Eaton Lattman, Chair, Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, "Proteins For Physicists" Abstract: For biologists protein molecules are the objects that carry out most of the important functions in living organisms.  For example, they catalyze chemical reactions (enzymes), they ferry other molecules around (cholesterol is carried by low density lipoprotein), they help control the environment inside the cell (ion channels, pumps). But protein molecules are also fascinating objects from the point of view of physics.  They are linear polymers that display behavior wildly different from the simpler polymers (e.g., polyethylene) studied by the statistical methods originating with Flory. There are twenty different possible monomers (amino acids) that are strung together to make a protein, while convention polymers have only one or two.  This allows for very complex behavior.  In addition, all protein molecules of a given type are IDENTICAL in the number of amino acids, in the sequence of amino acids.  The conformational behavior of the protein polymer chain is also exceptional.  When a protein is synthesized in the cell, the chain is in a poorly organized state reminiscent of the random coil in simple polymer theory.  However, the molecule rapidly undergoes a collapse to a unique three-dimensional structure that represents the active, native form of the molecule.  This process is called protein folding, and resembles a microscopic, first-order phase transition.  In the native, folded state all molecules of a given type have identical structures (ignoring dynamical fluctuations).  They can form well-ordered three-dimensional crystals:  presumably the wave function is coherent over an entire molecule. The talk will first provide a physically oriented introduction to protein molecules, and will then discuss methods to analyze and understand interesting aspects of protein behavior, such as folding.  The last few minutes will be devoted to the speaker’s work on the electrostatic behavior of proteins.
Reception to follow in Hayes Hall Lobby.  POSTPONED TO SPRING SEMESTER DUE TO BAD WEATHER

Week 15 - December 8 - 12

Tuesday, December 12

Last day of classes for Fall Semester!

Friday, December 12, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
   Contact:  Connie Miller, Dept. of Physics.   

Created by Bethany Anderson, Kenyon College 2005
 October 25, 2003
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