Calendar



Fall 2002


Week 1 - August 26 - 30

Monday, August 26

First day of classes for Fall Semester.

Thursday, August 29, 11:10AM - 12:00N

Meeting of Physics Department students and faculty on Thursday, August 29th at 11:10 AM (Common Hour) in MAP 213. On the agenda will be the senior exercise and honors, student jobs in physics, news and announcements, and some career advice.

Friday, August 30, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. (Not the usual location, but close!) Bring your lunch tray to Lower Dempsey to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, August 30, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Matthew Buckley, '03, Kenyon College. "Construction of a Superconducting Fixed Point Device." Matt will tell us about his experiences this summer at Cal Tech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory with ultrahigh precision, low temperature thermometry. Reception will follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 2 - September 2 - 6

Friday, September 6, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 6, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Ben Hildebrand, '03, Kenyon College. Reception will follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall. More information about Mr. Hildebrand's summer science project can be found on his web site .


Week 3 - September 9 - 13

Friday, September 13, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 13, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Professor  John Idoine, Department of Physics, Kenyon College . "Coded Aperture Imaging: A new technique for the creation of 3-dimensional nuclear images" Abstract: The goal of Nuclear Medicine is to use radioactive materials to diagnose and treat disease.  One aspect of this work is the creation of nuclear images which represent the distribution of radioactivity within the body.  We have developed a new three-dimensional imaging technique which uses a coded aperture  to cast a coded image onto a nuclear detector, much like a traditional pinhole camera casts an image onto film. The coded aperture is a thin sheet of Tungsten which contains a carefully chosen pattern of pinholes which allow gamma rays to pass. We have used point sources of radiation to measure the performance of our system, and animal experiments to demonstrate its usefulness  in vivo.  Our coded aperture system produced images that are clearly superior to those from traditional imaging systems due to improved  a) resolution, b) sensitivity,  c) signal-to-noise ratio, and d) 3-dimensional tomography.  We ll show you our results, and if we re lucky you may see the highest resolution 3D nuclear images ever recorded. Reception will follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 4 - September 16 - 20

Friday, September 20, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 20, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Nia Imara, '03, Kenyon College. "Too Much Noise in the Search for ET" Abstract: Scientists working in SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) are using and creating instruments on the cutting edge of technology in radio astronomy. In this presentation, a brief history of SETI will be given and the audience will be brought up to date on some of the world's largest telescopes. Additionally, I will go over my summer project at the SETI institute that dealt with a Number One Enemy of all radio astronomers--interference from satellite signals. Reception will follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 5 - September 23 - 27

Friday, September 27, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 27, 4-5PM

Presidential Search Open Forum, Bolton Theater (No Physics Colloquium today)


Week 6 - September 30 - October 4

Friday, October 4

Summer Science must be ready for printing.

Friday, October 4, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, October 4, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Ben Kowalski, '03, Kenyon College. "Ellipsometric measurements of semiconductor thin films" Abstract:  Studying the optical properties of a semiconductor is an important step towards using it in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices. We used spectroscopic ellipsometry to investigate the complex dielectric function of a series of  ZnMnTe ternary semiconductor thin films with different alloy concentrations. From this dielectric function, one can infer properties of the allowed electronic transitions in the semiconductor. In particular, we used modelling techniques to assign oscillators corresponding to the electronic transitions in the energy range between 0.7-6.5 eV for the ZnMnTe semiconductor system. Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 7 - October 7 - 11

Monday, October 7 and Tuesday October 8

October Reading Days!

Friday, October 11, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, October 11, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Dr. Terrance Klopcic, Director of Laboratories for Physics and Mathematics, Kenyon College. "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Kenyon - being an explosive introduction into a few facets of Structural Mechanical Engineering" Abstract:  In a series of high explosive tests of structural metal panels, a most unusual result was found for a common material under certain blast loads.  The explanation put forward by the speaker calls upon an exotic property of such materials.In order to present the rationale for these controlled experiments as well as to set the stage for the remainder of the talk, this presentation will briefly develop one of the common equations of Structural Mechanical Engineering.   By so doing, it will offer insights to the approaches and considerations of this noble field.  The experiment itself will then be presented along with its enigmatic results.  Finally, a possible explanation for the strange results will be presented, supported with a brief review of salient aspects of shock-wave dynamics.It should be a blast. Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 8 - October 14 - 18

Friday, October 18

Summer Science Poster Session

Friday, October 18, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 9 - October 21 - 25

Friday, October 25, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. (Not the usual location, but close!) Bring your lunch tray to Lower Dempsey to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, October 25, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Karina Leppik, '98. "Science from the South Pole, or Why I Went to Antarctica and Didn't See Any Penguins." Abstract: The Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) observes molecular clouds in our solar system from Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Karina Leppik spent five weeks working at the telescope and hopes to return soon to a more permanent position at the Pole. In her talk, she will share her experiences of life at the South Pole along with recent findings from the AST/RO project. Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 10 - October 28 - November 1

Thursday, October 31

Founders' Day.

Friday, November 1, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 1, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Keith Rielage, Kenyon College. "Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays: Conflicting results and future directions". Abstract: Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (E>1019 eV) were first discovered in the 1960 s but their source remains a mystery. The methods of detecting these particles with energies over 5 orders of magnitude greater than the most powerful man-made accelerator will be discussed. Two major groups, using experiments of different design, have recently released their results of the measured spectra of ultra-high energy cosmic rays and they conflict. These differences and their implications will be examined. To close, future proposed experiments that may resolve these disagreements will be presented. Some of these new detectors may utilize detector components being tested right here in Hayes Hall! Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 11 - November 4 - 8

Friday, November 8, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 8, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium(Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Keith Kalinowski, '69Systems Manager, Hubble Space Telescope Program Office, Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration  (NASA). "Hubble Space Telescope--Past, Present, Future ... and Beyond." Abstract: Though launched with much fanfare and great expectations in 1990, the untimely discovery of a flaw in the Hubble Space Telescope's primary mirror sent scientists and engineers scurrying for solutions. HST's unique design permitted those solutions to be implemented in late 1993, and has since permitted other essential repairs. Now past the halfway point of a planned twenty-year mission, HST is at the forefront of astronomical research. Additional servicing by astronauts will add two powerful new instruments in early 2005. At the same time, work underway on Hubble's successor--the James Webb Space Telescope--promises to make astrophysics in the second decade of the 21st century no less exciting, discovery-filled and eye-opening.
Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 12 - November 11 - 15

Friday, November 15, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 15, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium(Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Professor Thomas Humanic, Vice Chair for Graduate Studies Department of Physics, The Ohio State University. "Searching for exotic states of matter with relativistic heavy ion collisions" Abstract: Theories have existed for over 30 years that if nuclear matter is heated up to sufficiently high temperatures and/or compressed to sufficiently high densities that the quarks and gluons which are trapped in the protons and neutrons will be released into a new form of matter called Quark Matter or the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Quark Matter may have been the state of the early universe several microseconds after the Big Bang, and may exist at the centers of neutron stars today. Particle accelerators now exist which are powerful enough to collide heavy ions, such as gold on gold collisions, at velocities near the speed of light which might produce Quark Matter in the laboratory. In this talk I will discuss some recent experiments aimed at producing this exotic state of matter using accelerators at the CERN laboratory at Geneva, Switzerland, and the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY. Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 13 - November 18 - 22

Friday, November 22, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. (Not the usual location, but close!) Bring your lunch tray to Lower Dempsey to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 22, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium(Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Professor Wah Chiu, Alvin Romansky Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director, National Center for Macromolecular Imaging, Baylor College of Medicine. "Structural and computational approaches to the study of biological machines" From his web page : "Research in my laboratory focuses on the use of electron crystallography and cryomicroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. The assemblies we are studying range from cytoskeletal protein complexes, membranes, oligomeric proteins, and large viruses. Our laboratory is uniquely equipped with intermediate high-voltage electron cryomicroscopes that have been dedicated to advance the technology for imaging macromolecular assemblies embedded in vitreous ice. We are developing computational procedures to control the data collection by means of an electronic detector instead of photographic film. We are also seeking different computational methods of reconstructing three-dimensional structures of macromolecular assemblies from electron images. We have extensive collaborations with cell biologists to solve interesting structural problems and with computer scientists to develop novel algorithms for data analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction of single particles towards atomic resolution." Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Thanksgiving Break Week - November 25-29


Week 14 - December 2 - 6

Friday, December 6, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation. 

Friday, December 6, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium(Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, RBH 109) Witold K. Surewicz, Professor, Department of Physiology & Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University. "The Enigma of the Prion: A Biophysical Perspective" Abstract: Prion diseases constitute a group of infectious neurodegenerative disorders that include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and “mad cow disease” in cattle. A current hypothesis is that, the infectious agent is not a virus but an abnormal conformer of the prion protein (PrP^Sc). Furthermore, it is believed that this abnormal conformer propagates by interacting with the normal prion protein (PrP^C) and inducing it to switch its conformation into the abnormal form. The notion that an infectious agent can act by causing self-propagating changes in protein conformation constitutes one of the most intriguing puzzles of modern biology and biophysics. This seminar will describe the prion concept and discus recent studies aimed at understanding the biophysical mechanisms of self-perpetuating conformational changes in the prion protein. Reception to follow in the lobby of Hayes Hall.


Week 15 - December 9 - 13

Tuesday, December 10

Last day of classes for Fall Semester!

Friday, December 13, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.


   
Contact:
 Jennifer Hedden , Dept. of Physics. Updated 04/05/2003