Physics at Kenyon


Fall 2001


Week 1 - August 27 - 31

Monday, August 27

First day of classes for Fall Semester.

Thursday, August 30, 11:10AM - 12:00N

Meeting of Physics Department students and faculty on Thursday, August 30th at 11:10 AM (Common Hour) in MAP 213. On the agenda will be the senior exercise and honors, student jobs in physics, news and announcements, and some career advice.

Friday, August 31, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. (Not the usual location, but close!) Bring your lunch tray to Lower Dempsey to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, August 31, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Daniel Kiepfer, '03, Kenyon College. Reception follows in MAP 108. "Simulating Colloidal Interactions." Mr. Kiepfer will describe the results of his Summer Science project where he created a computer simulation of micron-sized particles in water that repel one another and undergo Brownian motion. He will describe techniques for analyzing the resulting motion to determine the repulsive interaction potential.
 

Saturday, September 1, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 2 - September 3 - 7

Friday, September 7, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 7, 3:10PM - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Frank Peiris, Kenyon College. Reception follows in MAP 108. "Measuring Dispersion Characteristics of Semiconductor Thin Films." Due to applications in optoelectronics, the knowledge of the dispersion of the index of refraction of semiconductors is very important property for people who design lasers and other optical devices. In this talk, Professor Peiris will discuss various experimental techniques that are useful in measuring these dispersion properties.


Week 3 - September 10 - 14

Friday, September 14, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 4 - September 17 - 21

Friday, September 21, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 21, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109). Jan Tobochnik, Kalamazoo College. Reception follows in MAP 108. Host: Paula Turner. "Modeling Granular Matter." The talk will discuss computer modeling and experimental modeling of granular matter such as sand. In particular, Prof. Tobochnik will discuss how the behavior of particles of granular matter differs from that of molecules. He will also discuss the role of computer simulations.


Week 5 - September 24 - 28

Friday, September 28, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, September 28, 3:10-4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Ben Williams, '95, University of Chicago. Reception follows in MAP 108. Host: Timothy Sullivan. "In-vivo Oxymetry Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging." In-vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging is an emerging spectroscopic imaging technique capable of quantitatively mapping certain physiologic parameters, including local molecular oxygen concentration, pH, microviscosity, and free radical distribution. In particular, quantitative mapping of oxygen tension in vivo has long been a goal in radiation biology. Ultimately, knowledge of the distribution of oxygen could be used to tailor radiation treatment of solid tumor cancers to increase tumor control without normal tissue complications. The goal of this research is to develop the technology and the experimental techniques needed to produce these oxygen concentration maps and to begin assessing the feasibility of EPR imaging as a potential clinical tool. In this talk, Mr. Williams will discuss the physical basis of EPR, the creation of EPR images, and present preliminary oxygen concentration measurements.

Friday, September 28, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 6 - October 1 - 5

Friday, October 5, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Week 7 - October 8 - 12

Monday, October 8 and Tuesday October 9

October Reading Days!

Friday, October 12, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, October 12, 3:10 - 4PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Matthew R. Buckley, '03, Kenyon College. Reception follows in MAP 108. "Construction of High Resolution Thermometers." Mr. Buckley will describe his summer research project at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on the creation of thermometers that can measure temperature with a resolution of 10 nK(!) between 0.7 and 1.0 K.


Week 8 - October 15 - 19

Friday, October 19, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, October 19, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Gabe Spalding, Illinois Wesleyan University. "Optical trapping involving large numbers of particles, or Getting a start on implementing Star Trek's holodeck" Professor Spalding will describe how a tailored array of laser "tractor beams" can be used to make patterns and assemblies of nanoparticles for use in optical devices, biology, and fundamental physics. A reception will follow in MAP 108.


Week 9 - October 22 - 26

Friday, October 26, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, October 26, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr., Kenyon College.  "What Kenyon Students Learned About Electricity in 1850." Professor Greenslade will describe the state of knowledge of electricity in 1850. He will discuss static and dynamic electricity and will show slides of apparatus used to demonstrate the phenomena. Reception to follow in the Schreiner Lounge (MAP 108).

Friday, October 26, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 10 - October 29 - November 2

Tuesday, October 30

Founders' Day.

Friday, November 2, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, November 2, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Timothy Sullivan, Kenyon College. "Tracking Brownian Motion in 3D or How to Abuse a Microscope to Get More Data." Professor Sullivan will describe how a colleague's deliberate misalignment of a microscope combined with a layer of gold allowed them to track micron-sized particles and study Brownian motion in 3D. A reception will follow in MAP 108.


Week 11 - November 5 - 9

Friday, November 9, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, November 9, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Natalia Kuznetsova, '95, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.  "Introduction to High Energy Physics for Anyone Interested." High Energy Physics addresses some of the most fundamental questions that people have asked since they first began to wonder about the world around them: "What are things made out of?" and "What holds them together?"  In her talk, Dr. Kuznetsova will describe the impressive progress that has been made in our understanding of the basic building blocks of nature over the past century.  She will also discuss how particle physicists look for the smallest possible particles.  Despite the fact that we now have a very intricate and beautiful picture of the way the Universe works, there are quite a few remaining unanswered questions, and Dr. Kuznetsova will briefly describe some of them. A reception will follow in the Schreiner Lounge (MAP 108).


Week 12 - November 12 - 16

Friday, November 16, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.

Friday, November 16, 3:10 PM - 4 PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Joe Shields, Ohio University. Reception follows in MAP 108. Host: Ben Schumacher. "Black Holes in Galaxy Nuclei." The talk will discuss that observations with the Hubble Space Telescope increasingly suggest that the majority of galaxies harbor very massive black holes in their centers. These objects are probably the faded remnants of powerful quasars, and their properties may hold clues to understanding the birth of galaxies.


Thanksgiving Break Week - November 19 - 23


Week 13 - November 26 - 30

Friday, November 30, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, November 30, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Joseph M. Prahl, NASA Payload Specialist STS-50/USML1, Professor and Chair,    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Case School of Engineering, Case Western Reserve University. Host: Tom Greenslade. "Laboratory Experiments in a Weightless Environment" Abstract: Laboratory experiments on the effects of reduced “gravity” (reduced body forces in the laboratory frame) on physico-chemical transport in fluids, crystal growth and combustion have been performed in a variety of facilities over the past 40 years and are planned for the International Space Station (ISS).  The dimensionless parameters of significance are utilized to assess the inherent strengths and weaknesses of these facilities, including normal gravity at reduced scale, neutral buoyancy tanks at normal gravity, drop towers, parabolic trajectory aircraft, sounding rockets, low-earth orbit huttle flights and the ISS.  The deleterious effects of aerodynamic drag, tidal force, structural natural frequencies, and attitude control thrusters will be discussed.  Results for insulin crystals grown aboard the shuttle are compared to those grown in ground based laboratories.  A diffusion limited transport mechanism is proposed which is consistent with the observations. A reception will follow in Schreiner Lounge (MAP 108).

Friday, November 30, 9:00 - 11:00 PM (weather permitting)

Open House at the Miller Observatory. The Miller Observatory is located 0.25 miles east of the new tennis courts by the Kokosing Gap Trail restroom facility. For further information, contact Professor Turner.


Week 14 - December 3 - 7

Friday, December 7, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.
 

Friday, December 7, 3:10 - 4:00PM

Physics Colloquium (Franklin Miller, Jr. Lecture Hall, MAP 109) Dan Gibson, Denison University. Reception follows in MAP 108. Host: Ben Schumacher. "Negative Ions: Market Forecasters or Electron Interferometers?" Atomic negative ions have been the subject of a wide variety of investigations over the years. Negative ions are found in stellar atmospheres, industrial plasmas and lighting discharges to name a few. In spite of their frequently low densities, negative ions often play key roles as either strategic information probes or the prevailing catalysts in complex systems. As such, these ions are also of great interest to those investigating effects on biological systems, including the human body. Due to the dominant nature of the electron correlations in negative ions, these inherently many-body systems present tremendous challenges for theoretical and calculational atomic physicists. Therefore, experimental negative ions research is critical to a wide variety of scientific pursuits. At Denison University, we use negative ions as a source of ultralow energy electrons to perform a quantum interference experiment in an electric field. We use laser spectroscopy to measure a number of inherently quantum mechanical effects, including below threshold tunneling and oscillations on the photodetachment cross section. These new results have implications for both high precision electron affinity measurements and for understanding resonance effects in numerous negative ion photodetachment experiments. So we will see that negative ions not only provide us with a fertile testing ground for atomic and molecular calculations and theories, they may even make you feel better!




Week 15 - December 10 - 14

Tuesday, December 11

Last day of classes for Fall Semester!

Friday, December 14, 12PM - 1PM

Physics Lunch. Bring your lunch tray to Dempsey Lounge (the room behind the partition at the south end of Lower Dempsey Dining Room) to join the department for stimulating conversation.


Contact: Jennifer Hedden, Dept. of Physics. Updated 7-October-2001(TSS) K-vector Kenyon shield